©2019 by Massimo Usai.

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Spoiler Alert: Lies could improve our life.

One of the first things we are educated from as a child is to always tell the truth. Yet, as a child, one of the first instincts we have is not always telling the truth.

Being still naive and tending only to survive and defend ourselves from the world bigger than us, as children, our lies are all tending to bring us personal advantages. But growing the use of the lie (but if you prefer: "is not always telling the truth") , is also synonymous with respect and protection towards others.

Imagine a world where only the truth is told. It does not take long to imagine that if in the morning at the bar meeting colleagues, you express yourself with loyalty, diplomatic incidents could be dramatic.

Your colleague, who has relationship problems, arrives, and you go out with a "Horrible as you are dressed today. Those legs then, you look fat. You are ugly today, what's happened to you?"

It is clear that using diplomacy and telling a lie, not only makes you a gentleman but allows the person to have a minimum of self-confidence and feel better and perhaps improve those things that she already knows well of her and does not need of your terrible "honestly" truth to put her more down.

Lately, I've been to a restaurant and met someone I haven't seen in almost twenty years. He didn't find a single sentence that was of the type "how nice to see you after all this time," but his phrase of happiness to see me, was "Hell, how fat you are!".

Now, in fact, I have not gained weight, only twenty years have passed, and I, like him, on the other hand, have changed physically, and thank God we no longer have that skinny physique we had at 20.

It would be ridiculous. But the guy did not analyze things and was probably happy that he was "honest."

In reality, he was just an idiot.

In political, relationships, and everyday life, lies are fundamental in the balance of things.

I could make a person happy, the truth could make the same person depress.

We need to know how to balance them and understand when this brings benefits to others. Only then is the lie valid and justified, in my opinion.

In religion, it is the lie that underlies people's hope. At the point of death, telling someone who will become food for worms in a few days and who will turn into bones in a short time, does not help the one who already sees his life escaping. Then that you have to invent a "lie," even if you don't believe in eternal life is that the moment that probably by telling the biggest lie in the world, that is that there is an eternal life made up of vast grasslands and peace, you are only doing good for others.

In short, they educate us as children not to tell lies, but we immediately understand that without lies, we cannot survive. Consequently, we adapt. Whoever says that the world would be better without lies has clearly not yet valued his words well.



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